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What is Vegetable Glycerin?

Vegetable Glycerin

Vegetable Glycerin (VG) is a carbohydrate that is generally available from plant oils. VG, also known as vegetable glycerin is used as the base for e-liquids in the electronic cigarettes industry. It is also used for various other purposes. It is used as an ingredient in cosmetic products and sweetener in food products. vegetabe glycerin molecular structure

Unlike propylene glycol (PG), VG has a slightly sweet taste. This can affect the e-liquid’s flavor. Vegetable glycerin is also a little more viscous than PG. According to a number of e-cigarette users, the viscosity of VG reduces the lifespan of atomizers. However, the reduction in lifespan is not substantially lower. There is an upside to VG’s viscosity as well. VG-based e-liquids produce thicker vapor than e-liquids that use PG. In order to enjoy the benefits of both VG and PG, many e-liquid makers use a mixture of both in the juices. In general, PG and VG are mixed in the ratio 80:20.

Both PG and VG are generally classified as safe substances by Health Canada. They are also considered as the most benign among the organic compounds known to mankind. They are also hypo-allergenic, non-teratogenic, non-carcinogenic and non-mutagenic. Diabetics are the only people who are likely to experience metabolic problems with vegetable glycerin. 

Some of the side-effects that people who change over to electronic cigarettes experience (within a few weeks of inhalation of vegetable glycerin) include dry mouth, throat soreness and increased thirst. Generally, these symptoms subside over a period of time if you drink plenty of water and other liquids.

We do not use vegetable glycerin in our electronic cigarettes or cartomizers, we have chosen to use only propylene glycol as we believe it to be a much more effective compound for use in our e-cigarettes and cartomizers. Additionally we have conducted independent testing amongst electronic cigarette smokers in Canada and have concluded that the majority of our test participants preferred PG over VG.